Rat Rods Rule / Undead Sleds - Hot Rods, Rat Rods, Beaters & Bikes... since 2007!

Go Back   Rat Rods Rule / Undead Sleds - Hot Rods, Rat Rods, Beaters & Bikes... since 2007! > Transmission, Rear End... Talk & Q&A!

Transmission, Rear End... Talk & Q&A! Tranny, rear end, drivetrain related stuff... shift it... grind it... pop da clutch!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-11-2017, 06:22 PM
oldblueoval oldblueoval is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 98
Default Welded rear axle?

OK, so I know about welding spider gears but I recently read an article in Hot Rod magazine about an old "barn find" dragster and they referred to cutting and welding the axle shaft when narrowing the rear end. They said the fellow didn't want to spend the money for the local machine shop to tool up to cut and re-spline the axle so he cut and welded them himself. Don't want to sound too dumb but how is this done? Is it cut out the right amount, grind a taper on each and weld away, do you sleeve it then? Help me friends. As always, Thanks in Advance
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-11-2017, 07:38 PM
Dr Crankenstein's Avatar
Dr Crankenstein Dr Crankenstein is offline
Rocket Surgeon
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: SK CAN
Posts: 4,855
Default

"Flirting With Disaster".

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0wxAMa3Prhk

I think he sectioned the axle and welded the splined section back on like you described. A sleeve would be good (space permitting) but still a horrible and dangerous way to shorten an axle shaft.

A friend once asked if I'd be willing to perform the same trick. He said it would be a low-powered "show" project. I told him I'd do it, but if it fails, you don't know me, my name, my ph# or address.

I suppose this sort of thing was common in decades past. I'm not old enough to know what they did back then, but I have seen some nasty failures due to "cheats" of this sort.

I'll be interested to hear other opinions on the subject... bob w?

.
__________________
- The distinction between psychological illness and creative thinking is wafer thin -

1937 Chevy Coupe
1938 Chevy Sedan
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-11-2017, 08:30 PM
Bamamav's Avatar
Bamamav Bamamav is offline
Rusty Rat Rodder
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Berry, Alabama
Posts: 4,191
Default

It was probably done a lot before a re-spline job became easier to get done. I'm with Dr C, I'd think a sleeve would be required to have maximum strength. One way to look at is, they weld the yokes on driveshafts, so whats the difference? It would probably be stronger than you think, but it might also be a weak spot.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-12-2017, 09:36 AM
kenny c kenny c is offline
Rusty Rat Rodder
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: West Greenwich R.I.
Posts: 2,119
Default

It will be a weak spot. I did what you described on a Mazda pickup rear end. It was for a trike with about 100 hp or less. and weighing 980 lbs. It has broken yet. The axle shaft on a Mazda is about 1-1/4 inches, way over kill for this application so I'm not scared. I have a friend that has done it to ford 9 inch for his modified garden tractor and has broken them.
__________________
Tetanus Tornado 49 F6
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-12-2017, 09:51 AM
Sam_Fear's Avatar
Sam_Fear Sam_Fear is offline
Brother Rat
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Dixon, IA
Posts: 12,228
Default

I've wondered about this too. No way would I do it on a dragster, truck, or anything that put a huge amount of torque to the ground.

So what's gonna happen if it snaps?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-12-2017, 12:20 PM
Bamamav's Avatar
Bamamav Bamamav is offline
Rusty Rat Rodder
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Berry, Alabama
Posts: 4,191
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam_Fear View Post
So what's gonna happen if it snaps?
If it's on a axle that is retained at the flange by the bearings like a Ford 9", probably nothing, would be the same as any other broken axle. But if it was on a Ford 8.8 or GM 12 bolt where they use c clips to keep the axles in, unless it had the c clip eliminators you'd be watching your tire and axle stub passing you by....
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-12-2017, 12:36 PM
Old Iron's Avatar
Old Iron Old Iron is offline
Rusty Rat Rodder
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Willard Mo.
Posts: 10,103
Default

If it's on a high power high traction vehicle, it'll send you to the ditch or worse, into oncoming traffic when under acceleration.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-12-2017, 01:55 PM
Dr Crankenstein's Avatar
Dr Crankenstein Dr Crankenstein is offline
Rocket Surgeon
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: SK CAN
Posts: 4,855
Default

I broke an axle (side) gear once... the c-clip fell out and the axle tried to leave the scene. I was lucky. It broke when I dumped the clutch and the car was hardly moving. The axle slid out 10 maybe 12 inches, but it could have been different...

Five minutes before the failure, I was banging gears on our "main drag". If that gear had failed at the 2-3 or the 3-4 shift... there'd be flowers to mark the spot.

.
__________________
- The distinction between psychological illness and creative thinking is wafer thin -

1937 Chevy Coupe
1938 Chevy Sedan
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-12-2017, 03:17 PM
Neto Neto is offline
Super Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Holmes Co, Ohio
Posts: 280
Default

I'm not an experienced welder at all, especially not this sort of thing, so I have a question, too. When a weld like this breaks, it will be at the edge of the heated area, correct? I busted one of the rear arms on a three-point tractor attachment when I didn't get the one-way out of the ground in time on a turn in hard dry ground. My Uncle got it welded back up, but it kept breaking at the edge of the heat. A guy from Argentina whose dad was a blacksmith told me that you have to heat the whole piece (or at least a fairly wide area?) in a forge, then weld it while it's cherry red. Anybody ever hear this, or try it?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-12-2017, 04:36 PM
klink's Avatar
klink klink is offline
Rusty Rat Rodder
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Brighton, Michigan
Posts: 614
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neto View Post
I'm not an experienced welder at all, especially not this sort of thing, so I have a question, too. When a weld like this breaks, it will be at the edge of the heated area, correct? I busted one of the rear arms on a three-point tractor attachment when I didn't get the one-way out of the ground in time on a turn in hard dry ground. My Uncle got it welded back up, but it kept breaking at the edge of the heat. A guy from Argentina whose dad was a blacksmith told me that you have to heat the whole piece (or at least a fairly wide area?) in a forge, then weld it while it's cherry red. Anybody ever hear this, or try it?
Any steel that has been heat treated will crack if it hasn't been annealed. The harder it is the faster it cracks... just as you described... right on the edge of the heat zone.
__________________
Klink...
My 1930 Chevy Build.
http://www.ratrodsrule.com/forum/showthread.php?t=21244
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Rat Rods Rule Inc.