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  #11  
Old 05-20-2016, 11:18 AM
phil cottingham phil cottingham is offline
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  #12  
Old 11-14-2016, 07:37 PM
phil cottingham phil cottingham is offline
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I finally got started on my project after months of dealing with others things. Would a chevy pickup straight front axle be easier to adapt to my El Camino brakes and hubs than the Studebaker axle? I can get a 57 chevy axle cheap. Also I have thought about using rack and pinion for steering but am confused about which ones will work. I know there is a difference in one that mounts in front or rear of the axle. I don't want to have to turn left to go right. I want the rack and pinion to be behind the axle. Any thoughts on what to look for at the junk yard. I'm going to get pictures as soon as I can get my wife to help. I'm a lot lower tech that most of you guys. I use a flip phone. Thanks for any help you can give.
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Old 11-16-2016, 08:20 AM
phil cottingham phil cottingham is offline
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  #14  
Old 11-16-2016, 10:23 AM
bob w bob w is offline
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I'd use the Chevy axle with the brakes that are on it. Or else, get a disc brake kit for it. You would need a rear steer rack such as a Dodge Omni. A Mustang box works good for cross steering and can be found on eBay for a good price. BED works with this stuff all the time and can give you better information. PM him.
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  #15  
Old 11-16-2016, 05:24 PM
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Cavalier rack might be a good choice, too. Mount it to the frame, then tie rods to the spindles. Might have to extend the center portion where the tie rods mount with a piece of plate to get it low enough.
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Old 11-16-2016, 06:21 PM
phil cottingham phil cottingham is offline
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Thanks for the reply. What year dodge Omni or Cavalier would I need to look for. I've never dealt with either one. The reason for wanting to change the brakes was to keep the wheel bolt pattern the same as my rear end. The rack and pinion looked good because of eliminating parts and bad angles on steering stuff. Still studying on it. Any advice is greatly appreciated.
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  #17  
Old 11-16-2016, 08:25 PM
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Phil, if you bolt a rack to your I beam axle, you are going to have to have some kind of slip joint in the shaft to allow for axle movement. It has been done before, just giving you an idea on it. that is why I suggested the Cavalier rack, it bolts to the firewall in it's natural environment, so bolting it to the frame works just as well, and you eliminate the need for the slip joint.

I wish I had of went that way with mine, the Saginaw box takes a lot of room. I ended up having to get a set of Explorer manifolds to clear the box on mine.

I would say in the 2000's for year on the Caviler rack. Omni is 90's I think.
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  #18  
Old 11-16-2016, 09:37 PM
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Dr Crankenstein Dr Crankenstein is offline
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Pros and cons.

A rack attached to the frame will suffer some bump steer when used with a solid axle... as the axle moves up and down, toe will move in and out.

A rack attached to the axle suffers no bump steer or change in toe (excessive articulation excluded) , but requires a proper slip joint as mentioned.

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Old 11-16-2016, 10:00 PM
phil cottingham phil cottingham is offline
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Thanks for the info guys. I'm just trying to weigh all the pros and cons. I may make a trip to pull-a-part in Mobile and see what they have. I have all the steering parts off the El Camino that might could be made to work. Next week I'm going to put everything back together after having it apart for welding. I'll be able tell how things look better then. Thanks again.
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  #20  
Old 11-16-2016, 10:35 PM
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Bamamav Bamamav is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Crankenstein View Post
Pros and cons.

A rack attached to the frame will suffer some bump steer when used with a solid axle... as the axle moves up and down, toe will move in and out.

A rack attached to the axle suffers no bump steer or change in toe (excessive articulation excluded) , but requires a proper slip joint as mentioned.

.
I would agree on a rack where the tie rods are on the ends, but the Cavalier is a center steer, the tie rods are attached in the center of the rack. The tie rods will have a longer arc, so any bump steer should be very minimal or none at all. It shouldn't be any different on a i beam than on a IFS, the longer arc should prevent bump steer. As long as the tie rods are parallel to the ground and level, I think it would work fine on a I beam axle. that's the beauty of the center hung tie rods, you extend the center mounting points down until they are level, yet you don't lose any travel side to side.

Is that about as clear as mud? It makes sense the way it was described to me.
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